Comparisons

TFZ Queen vs TFZ King Pro

The Queen has more sub-bass quantity while the King Pro has a slight edge for its extension. The King Pro is able to showcase a good mastery. The sub-bass reproduction is fuller on the Queen. The mid-bass on the Queen has more body than the King Pro and it contributes to the slam with a more weighted feeling. The Queen brings a good punch. The bass texture on the Queen is rendered more smoothly while the bass decay on the King Pro is quicker with agility. The midrange on the King Pro is expressed cleanly while the Queen demonstrates lushness. The lower mids on the Queen has more body than the King Pro and it benefits male vocals. Emotions are conveyed effectively. The upper mids on the King Pro has more forwardness and female vocals are lively. The King Pro has better definition. Next for the treble, the King Pro has more extension with crisp and sparkle. The amount of air rendered on the King Pro is greater. There is no sibilance and harshness. The details retrieval on the King Pro has a higher level. Lastly, there is a natural expansion on both. The width magnitude on the King Pro is greater and the Queen has a more closed in depth.

TFZ Queen vs Shozy Hibiki Special Edition

The Hibiki SE has less sub-bass quantity than the Queen but it is extended more. The sub-bass reproduction on the Hibiki SE is punchy and elevates the engagement level. The mid-bass on the Queen has additional body which helps to give its slam a weighted feeling. The slam delivered on the Queen is less agile than the Hibiki SE. The bass texture on the Queen is rendered more smoothly than the Hibiki SE. The bass decay on the Hibiki SE is more pacey and each bass note is articulated with a quicker attack. The Queen has the fuller bass performance but the Hibiki SE is more lively. The midrange on both is rendered cleanly and the Hibiki SE commands slightly better definition. The lower mids on the Queen has more body than the Hibki SE which results in a thicker presentation that is able to do male vocals competently. The upper mids on the Hibiki SE has the additional forwardness which helps to give an intimate female vocals presentation. Next, in the treble section, the treble on the Hibki SE is brighter than the Queen and the extension is slightly greater. There is no sibilance and harshness. The Queen renders extra air. Lastly, the Hibiki SE has a natural expansion for its soundstage and it has an edge for the width magnitude. The depth of the Queen is more closed in.

TFZ Queen vs iBasso IT01

The IT01 has slightly less sub-bass quantity than the Queen and the IT01 has greater extension. The Queen has a fuller sub-bass reproduction while the IT01 presents it in a more clinical manner. Rumble on both is quite natural. The mid-bass on the Queen has extra quantity and the slam is expressed in a rich manner. Each bass note on the IT01 is articulated with better precision. The bass texture on the Queen is rendered more smoothly than the IT01. Bass decay on the IT01 is quicker and provides a higher engagement level. The midrange on the IT01 is expressed in a cleaner manner with better transparency. On the other hand, the Queen takes on a more full bodied manner. The lower mids on the Queen is slightly thicker than the IT01 and provides a denser feeling. The upper mids on the IT01 is boosted and the extra forwardness helps to create a more intimate female vocals presentation. There is additional liveliness. In the treble section, the IT01 has better extension. The amount of air rendered is greater on the IT01 and it gives an airy feeling. There is no sibilance and harshness. The Queen has more body in the treble and it is much smoother. Lastly, both expands naturally for its soundstage. The IT01 has a greater width magnitude while the depth of the Queen is more closed in.

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Page 5: Conclusion